Author Topic: camera buoyancy  (Read 4516 times)

pmcdonal

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camera buoyancy
« on: July 23, 2008, 20:20:46 UTC »
after spending 8 days diving in bali i noticed my right wrist was swelling and hunting i realized that i was shooting my canon 20d with one hand and at my age 62 with about 500 dives that i had a problem that was creating camera shake as well as the pain.  so one of my HUPS sent me to wet pixel where i found a product called Stix which added buoyancy to camera you can now hold camera with one finger in the water.  have not shot it yet but i believe it's going to work.  incidently my equipment is canon 20d/ ikelite housing/ two ikelite 125 strobes,and ultra lite arms.  the cost if you have ultra lite arms is $50 if not the arms are about $500 and for now stix will only accommodate it's own arms or ultra lite.

frogfish2

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Re: camera buoyancy
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2008, 05:22:16 UTC »
Stix buoyancy pieces are great - I recently acquired a set, and am a happy user.  But this might not solve (or may not completely solve) your problem.   

For me, shooting wide-angle with a zoom lens (requiring an extension ring behind the big dome port), led to a special problem because of the buoyancy of the dome port, extended further out in front by the extension ring, which creates a powerful torque along an axis through the housing as the dome port wants to rotate to facing upwards.  On a long trip shooting a lot of w/a, I started to have wrist problems too.  It's not a problem when holding the housing with both hands (or shooting macro,) obviously.

If you have this problem, I'd recommend thinking about where the stix pieces can be added to best counter-act that rotational torque.  Alternatively, you may find (as I did) that you need to switch to a bottom-mounted tray to shift the axis of rotation away from the center of the handle, even though this may make the entire rig even more negatively buoyant.

Frogfish2

pmcdonal

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Re: camera buoyancy
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2008, 15:37:39 UTC »
glad i've got part of it solved i've not had my camera in salt water since adding the stix but had thought it might react like you describe.  can you give me more detail on solution to w/a with dome port and 15mm fisheye

frogfish2

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Re: camera buoyancy
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2008, 23:55:04 UTC »
For me (this is for a ND2 Subal housing), the solution was to pull off the Subal handles and use my old ULCS tray, bolted to the bottom of the housing, with the strobe arms coming off the tops of handles on each side of the housing.  It made the rig heavier, but shifted the axis of rotation low enough to basically remove the problem of the twisting force on my wrist.   

As I said, this was only a really serious problem when I was using the w/a port on an extension ring, for example with the 12-24 or 17-35 zoom (and that only on a longish trip) -  because of the extra buoyancy pushed further in front of the housing, creating sort of a lever arm effect.  With just a fish-eye lens (and therefore no extension ring), switching to tray-mounted handles probably wouldn't be necessary.

I used the stix arms with the dome port in early july, still using the ULCS tray and handles.  Last week, shooting macro, I used the Subal handles for the first time.  Seemed fine.  The next test for me will be whether I can find some configuration with the stix arms that would let me go back to the Subal handles, save the weight of carrying the tray and ULCS handles.

 

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