Author Topic: tip your crew people  (Read 4888 times)

Souldiver

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tip your crew people
« on: July 19, 2010, 22:27:45 UTC »
  I have been working in the dive industry for twelve years.  I am a Padi Course Director and a lisenced captain working in Hawaii.  I have two kids and work 60+ hours a week to support my family.  We go above and beyond everyday to ensure the safety and fun of our divers and we work really hard.  For all you people that think working dive charters is a fun and easy job you are wrong.  I have seen so many people try to dive for a living and fail because they cannot handle the stress and get burnt out in six months. 
SO FOR GODS SAKES PEOPLE TIP YOUR DIVE CREW
If you have been on a dive trip, had a great time with great service and leave the crew with just a hand shake, you are an ass.  We do not like you and dont want you to come back.  I find it amazing that people will spend all day with their dive crew and not tip a dime then go out to dinner that night and tip the guy that fills their water glasses.

marob

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Re: tip your crew people
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2010, 19:39:53 UTC »
I can see the point re the waiter - solution don't tip the waiter unless they provide service beyond expectation.

Whilst inaccurate, the common belief is that TIP = "to insure promptness"; it is not to supplement salary. Look to your employer to pay you and charge the correct amount upfront.

A gratuity should rightly be for exceptional or service beyond that normally expected, not for having services provided to a customer for which that customer has already paid the asking price.

Look to Scandinavian & Japanese cultures where tipping is generally regarded as demeaning, suggesting the recipient is socially inferior to the provider.

ldg7

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Re: tip your crew people
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2010, 23:44:45 UTC »
Man, that really made me want to dive with you.  I've always tipped, what I thought was generous, but never thought I had to.  I did it because I thought the service was above what I had already paid for.
You really said a mouthful.  I think I am going to have to rethink this whole tipping thing.  Hopefully, you don't speak for the diving industry.

scubawoman

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Re: tip your crew people
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2010, 16:50:37 UTC »
I agree that people should tip the crew.  We do not live in Japan or partake in their culture.  Dive operators should be able to give decent wages, but the past 5 years have been hell on tourism.  I live in Cozumel and have seen both sides of the story.  People do not automatically become instructors, dive masters or boat captains - they pay for their books and licenses and education.  They must comply with the rules of the harbor master, buy insurance and keep up to date in diving first aid.  Many must learn a second or third language; they brave the elements good and bad; they are at the mercy of their employers who want to offer more to the clients, usually via extra trips, etc.

They help each other clean the boats, wash the gear, get the tanks filled; make repairs.  And they must be able to save your life when you make a stupid mistake.  There is no foreseeable solution - employers must pay for boat permits, buy the boats, pay hospitalization, listen to clients gripe about paying for a 2 tank dive.  How much do people pay to golf?  Fish?  Ski? Go to a professional football or basketball game?  Think about it - scuba diving necessitates service-orientated personnel that are prepared to go the whole 9 yards for you - you should treat them like your brother!

jghart2

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Re: tip your crew people
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2010, 01:47:18 UTC »
I agree tip, tip, tip.  If you are diving in a country with a culture that finds it offensive, then don't. But otherwise tip.  I tip the crew because they are professional, provide great service, and are friendly and helpful always.  I have not had the misfortune to dive with an outfitter anywhere, where I felt I received poor service--I am sure I will eventually, and I will deal with that when it happens.  But in the meantime--I tip.  The question then becomes--how much.  I leave that up to you.  In the U.S. the standard seems to be 15 to 20%--But 15 to 20% of what?  I figure it is 15-20% of the cost of each boat trip since I tip at the end of each boat trip.  I don't reduce it because of my perception of what the local standard of living is in relationship to where I come from.  I tip based on my culture, until someone corrects me.   I observe that probably less than 1/2 of the passengers tip, and I don't understand it.  They chit chat saying how drunk on tequila they got, or how much shopping they do, etc.  but they can't cough up a tip for the crew--nope, i don't understand it.

MetriRN

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Re: tip your crew people
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2010, 19:31:51 UTC »
I hear you and I'm sympathetic.  I do tip reasonably, and how much depends on where I'm diving, with what type of operator, level of service, etc. etc. but here's what I REALLY think about it:

I find tipping to be in the same league as a service or convenience charge on concert tickets; the ticket is $50, but the "service charges" add up to $10 per ticket (for example).  I resent being presented with a certain price, then having to pay additionally for "service".   I feel any provider of a product or service should charge what it costs plus a profit, put that price out there and that's what the consumer decides to pay.   So, whether you're a concert promoter or a dive operator, charge one price and that's it!  That includes your 60-hr weeks, your insurance, labor and harbor expenses, etc. 

If you fail to do this, you are accepting the risk that you may not get tipped, either because of the ignorance of your customers, their country of origin, or their plain outright cheap-itude.  You may use the excuse that if you stated your price accurately, with everything included, no one would buy, or you would appear to be more expensive than your competitors.  To address these two issues, I would offer the following.

"The customer may not buy":  The customer has to make a decision, and you can market the dive trip as "all inclusive--no additional charges or tipping required".  I'm sure there are a lot of folks like me who would gravitate to that sort of marketing. 

"We would appear more expensive, less competitive":  Again, it's about educating your customer, marketing, and understanding that those who don't tip, don't understand about tipping, will go to the other operator.    Either operator has to decide what profit margin they are willing/able to operate with, understanding that to depend on tipping, especially in a tough economy or with an international customer base, is a big risk.   

Overseas on a liveaboard, many operators just state that they EXPECT 10% of the price as a crew tip--they depend on the tip to pay their crews (including the background folks like cooks, engineer, etc.).  I think this is unconscionable, really, and the crews end up hating those whose culture it is to not tip.   Why should I tip the ship's engineer, or cook?   Or the customer may have had good service from one crew member but poor service from another.   It's crazy.

This is the INDUSTRY's fault, IMHO, and they should just charge what it costs plus their acceptable profit margin.  If I choose to tip the guy who recovered my camera when it came off my wrist and floated up to the surface (which I did, and generously), then yes, tipping is appropriate. But to expect me to tip to pay everyone's salary, that's crazy.  Just charge what you need to charge, and if you don't, you run the risk of not getting that tip. :-\

 

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