Author Topic: Oxygen On-Board  (Read 7294 times)

jdives

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Oxygen On-Board
« on: July 12, 2008, 19:50:52 UTC »
I recently went diving in the Eastern Pacific  where they do not have the practice to keep oxygen on-board, as most who dive there a very conservative.  (ha!  As if that prevents DCS!) The nearest hyperbaric chamber was 25 miles by boat. 

Anyone else finding this to be a problem?  What's the best procedure -- take your own on-board?
Life's Short -- Dive Hard!

amith2

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2008, 18:26:44 UTC »
Always ask if the is O2 on board if they don't mention it in a briefing before you leave the dock (you should not have to ask, they should tell you).  You should not go without it, especially in a relatively remote area.  If you find an operator that does not carry O2 post it on as many forums like this as possible to let others know.

jdives

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2008, 16:27:52 UTC »
Good idea, Amith2.  In this case the few other operators also did not carry oxygen.  It was a matter of going anyway or scrap an expensive trip once there.  Any other suggestions?  It never occurred to me to check in advance, as it was a PADI based op, I just assumed.
Life's Short -- Dive Hard!

Wayan123

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2008, 09:30:29 UTC »
Demand it be available onboard and also that personnel are trained and current in administrating O2.  Have seen a lot of operators with O2 available but staff find it difficult to assemble the equipment which is not very re-assuring.  And yes inform the dive public it is all about education..............

marob

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2008, 13:43:36 UTC »
Wayan, sounds Indonesian. Do you work for a dive business in or around Bali?

jlf0

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2008, 14:22:42 UTC »
When I'm selecting a dive op, I check the website to see if it's mentioned that they have oxygen on board. If not, it's one of the questions that I ask before booking with them.

I've never dove in an area where none of the dive ops have oxygen on board - not sure what I'd do in that case.

I agree that it's too late once you are already there.


JoAn

Wayan123

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2008, 01:02:55 UTC »
Living in Bali.  I was the Captain of a live-a-board for a number of years here in Indonesia operating in Raja Empat, Komodo and Sulawesi

smoore

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2008, 17:50:42 UTC »
I know of a situation in Cuba where the literature for the dive operator specifically indicated that the boats had oxygen but they didn't.  I think this forum is going to be the best place to check on these types of questions.

I would be totally impractical to take oxygen with you.  You would have to acquire it locally which I suspect would be next to impossible. 

Even if you have oxygen locally I suspect that it would only last about an hour.  Unless there is  way to get to the chamber quickly (air ambulance), I suspect that you would only have oxygen available for part of the trip. 

Unfortunately, this is one of the risks of diving in remote locations. 

I used to have a rule that I wouldn't dive with any operator who didn't have oxygen, a head, a radio and who didn't keep someone on the boat when we were diving.  In some locations trying to find operators who can provide that level of service is impossible.  For example, when I dive in Saba some operators don't have any of the above.  However, the dives are rarely more than 10 minutes from the chamber, you can easily swim to shore and I guess I could pee in my suit if I had to, so I have been prepared to run the risks. 

Everyone has to decide what they are comfortable with and what they are not comfortable with.  However, I wouldn't want to be caught far from a chamber without oxygen. 
Steve Moore

blacktip

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Re: Oxygen On-Board
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2009, 16:06:31 UTC »
I don't go on a boat w/o O2

 

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