Author Topic: Stingray City feeding disrupts ray behavior.  (Read 7923 times)

DocV

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Stingray City feeding disrupts ray behavior.
« on: June 03, 2009, 11:50:27 UTC »
And apparently not just in trivial ways.

I find this disturbing, but not exexpected:

"Biology professor's studies link tourist activity in Cayman Islands to disruption of stingrays

Betsy Cohen
Issue date: 4/10/09 Section: Campus

Based on the research of a University of Rhode Island professor, tourist activity in the waters off the Grand Cayman Islands is responsible for the disruption of behaviors and an increase in the size of the female population in stingrays.

Biology professor Bradley Wetherbee has been studying the effects of sites where tourists feed wild stingrays in the Grand Cayman Islands since 2002.

In 2002, 2003 and 2008, Wetherbee traveled to Stingray City, one of the world's most popular dive sites, where he began his research.

"We were interested in how feeding the stingrays was influencing their behavior," Wetherbee said.

In the wild, stingrays are known to be nocturnal and maintain a diet consisting of organisms that dwell on the sea floor.

"From an evolutionary point of view, for millions of years these stingrays have been nocturnal," Wetherbee said.

"Tourists start feeding them during the day and they reverse their behavior. They became very active during the day, or diurnal, which they never were before, and now they sleep all night."

Wetherbee explained that in the wild, stingrays are bottom-feeders, and do not typically eat non-natural prey items, such as squid, which many tourists have been feeding them.

"They eat a lot of invertebrates, worms and shellfish," he said. "Their mouths are on the bottom, so they swim along and dig up stuff in the substrate mostly. They do catch little fish sometimes but it's mostly invertebrates."

Allison Seifter, a sophomore at URI who will be majoring in marine biology, helped organize the data from Wetherbee's research and presented it at the 2009 Northeast Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Seifter said the largest ray Wetherbee found was a female measuring 120 centimeters in diameter for its disk width.
"I was surprised that the females are a lot bigger than the males, almost twice as big," said Seifter. "With people feeding these rays, they're getting to really big sizes that they wouldn't usually grown to in the wild."

Wetherbee's research concluded that the female stingray population in tourist areas has also increased.

With the assistance of several graduate students during the summers of 2002 and 2003, Wetherbee caught and tagged 181 stingrays in Stingray City.

"Over 80 percent of the rays there were females," Wetherbee said of his findings.

Seifter added that in the wild, there is a more equal balance between the male and female stingray populations, approximately 50 percent males and 50 percent females, with a spectrum of sizes.

Wetherbee said during the study he attached transmitters to the stingrays to locate them in efforts to study their behavior.

By tracking stingrays in various locations off the island and in deep water, Wetherbee was able to conclude that these stingrays are becoming more active during the day, supporting his earlier evidence.

After catching a ray, researchers would place the animal in a small pool and measure it on a meter grid.

Wetherbee said that along with catching them in a net, he relied on the tour operators to catch the rays because they frequently caught rays to hand to tourists who had their picture taken with them.

"The rays are very friendly, very tame, docile," Wetherbee said.

According to Professor Wetherbee, more than 70 countries around the globe operate sites where people can interact with wildlife and feed them.

The Guy Harvey Research Institute in Florida funded his research on this particular study."

Regards,

DocVikingo

blacktip

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Re: Stingray City feeding disrupts ray behavior.
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2009, 21:43:49 UTC »
I would ask if this is irreversible. If not does someone have a plan?

DocV

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Looks like the plan is a floating bar.
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2009, 16:51:37 UTC »
New floating bar for Stingray City
http://www.caycompass.com/cgi-bin/CFPnews.cgi?ID=10387930

Swell.

Regards,

DocVikingo

siamdivers

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Re: Stingray City feeding disrupts ray behavior.
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2011, 04:35:25 UTC »
I don't understand why people can still distinct feeding land animals from marine animals. Feeding wildlife of any kind doesn't work. It never benefits the animals in any way, shape or form and rarely benefits humans. Some of us on this forum are old enough to remember the feeding of the bears in Yosemite and Yellowstone. It seems so obvious now that that was never a good idea for so many reasons. So why doesn't this same logic apply to the oceans? We still have (mostly) non divers feeding fish at dive sites here in Thailand (but also feeding monkeys on land. I keep a wide berth from human-fed "wild" monkeys! Yikes!). I thought Cayman was more progressive and enlightened than this.

 

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