Author Topic: Sharing Air  (Read 6811 times)

Anne

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Sharing Air
« on: October 16, 2008, 20:33:56 UTC »
I was reading the Undercurrent article on Xcalak and noted that one of the DMs used their octopus to extend the diving time and the author (SVM) just mentioned it in passing as a positive.  We had a DM do this for my husband in St. Maartins once, which was new for us, but not at all stressful, it was not an out of air situation, we knew the guy well, but when we got home I posted the question about how common this was on another forum and got blasted about how unsafe it is and how irresponsible the DM was, so just wondering what folk's thought here are (please be nice  :)

Anne
Baltimore, MD

RussFair

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2008, 02:16:03 UTC »
We saw a similar situation recently in Cozumel.  1 new diver (his 12th dive) joined us for one day.  We were 2 experienced divers on air, 4 very experienced divers on Nitrox, all with good air consumption on low pressure steel tanks.  The DM kept a close but unobtrusive eye on the newbie, and when the guy got down to about 1000psi he had him breath from his tank for about 15 minutes.  Everyone stayed calm, enjoyed the full dive and the newbie got to finish the dive on his own do a full safety stop and get back in the boat with air left over.

No one ever felt unsafe.  IF the guy started sucking too much from the DMs tank, he could have gone back to his own and we would have ended the dive calmly from there.  We all commented to the DM how well he handled the situation.  And there was no griping about coming up early because the newbie ran out of air.


NJDIVER

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2008, 10:12:08 UTC »
What happened with every diver is responsible for themselves.  The air you go down with is the air you consume.  Though the practice seems harmless is it really the right thing to do?  I guess it's personal preference...one preference I would not find myself doing on a regular basis, as it could become habit forming.

blacktip

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2009, 16:05:03 UTC »
Lets go back to Diving 101 (basic scuba training). Check your gear, check your equipment, check your buddy's air,equipment etc

smoore

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2009, 18:28:16 UTC »
I have run into this situation twice.  The first time a diver who had not been in the water for a dozen years ran through air so fast that he was out of air about 1/2 way into the dive.  The next thing I knew he was sharing air with his wife.  This occurred in St. Maarten and the DM saw it but didn't do anything.  I saw this as a recipe for for two divers being in trouble.

The next year I had my second stage fail (no air would flow)at the beginning of a dive (this failure was the subject of an article in Undercurrent a couple of years ago).  I went to my Air 2 and finished the dive.  I stayed very close to my wife for the balance of the dive and I was diving with a Spare Air so I felt safe.  The DM was aware of my problem and he asked us to stay close to him which we did.   This was probably not the best move I have made diving but it was an easy dive and I didnt' want to end the my first dive in a year.

Steve Moore

bmoen45

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2009, 05:43:06 UTC »
I don't think that it is very common because of the inherent  risks.  That said, it did happen to me once.  I was a customer on a boat dive off Vancouver Island, Canada.  I had one of my own tanks and rented a second tank.  After my first dive, I realized that the rental tank was a Yoke and my tank and reg are DIN.   So I told the captain and intended to sit out the second dive.  The DM spoke up.  He had a 7 foot hose on his primary. He offered to dive with his secondary and let me use the primary.  I declined, but then changed my mind. I accepted if we could limit our depth to above 40 feet.  My tank still had 600 lbs and so I used it as my backup.  The DM and I had dove together before  this trip and were comfortable with each other.  Turned out to be a good dive, maybe 25 minutes and saw a GPO.  Probably not wise, but it worked out OK. 

indigodive

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2009, 15:47:50 UTC »
New divers on a boat with experienced divers usually are not well accepted by the 'old timers'. It that same in skiing, no-one wants to have to wait for the new guy guy to make his way with a snow plough on a red run!

The answer? Well what I do is pick sites that I know well, and plan the dive so that the new diver can get a nice dive without inflicting any time constraints on the other divers. Keep the new divers profile more shallow, make sure that he can get back to the boat without sucking his air past the 500psi point, and ultimately become a better diver.

Supplying air to new divers to supplement their original tank is wrong in so many ways. Too many to list here for sure!

I consider myself to be a DIVE PROFESSIONAL and I have a responsibility to provide role model behavior to those diving with me. There is so much PADI bashing around at the moment, and it makes me very cross when I hear things like this being condoned by the dive community... it's wrong folks!

I'm sure that the DM sharing his alt thought that he was doing the right thing. The diver would have appreciated the extra air and the other divers will have appreciated the extra bottom time, and the DM will have appreciated the extra tips! (Objection your honour! Speculation!  ;))

As a leader of dives it really upsets me when folks who should know better get their panties in a knot about having to dive with newly qualified divers. I do my best to run separate dives for new folks / experienced folks, but some times its just not possible.

Please remember, we were all newbies once upon a time so a little more support and understanding to the new divers and the DMs / Instructors that are charged with looking after them would go a very long way!


Kay Wilson,
Indigo Dive.


ctimms

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Re: Sharing Air
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2009, 02:29:22 UTC »
Where was this divers buddy? One of the first questions I ask a dive op. is will I be able to dive my own computer! The last thing I want to do on a vacation where the diving cost me $100.00 plus per trip is to have to surface when the first diver runs out of air! This include an insta buddy. If you are on an advance dive and only dive on vacation you should let the Op. know so they can make arraignments for you to surface early, it is just not fair for everyone else to pay full fair and surface with 1200psi left in their tank. If he is the buddy I brought then him and I will surface or I will at least shoot a signal marker that he can surface with until the boat picks him up. I know I am a crappy buddy but I normally dive solo and have spent the time and money to have the equip. to be safe!

 

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